Mosques as Voids in the Cityscape

Turquoise Domes: Empty Monuments

Since old days when Islam enters Iran, Iranians had religious tendencies and old kingdoms developed many worship spots (like mosques) in the main cities.  After National Revolution of Iran in 1979 Islam becomes an important part of politics and Mosques became like political power monuments. The mixture of politics and religion and in fact using religion (as people's belief  system) to apply power on people and ignoring their citizenship rights have made a large number of people far from religion sanctities. While current generation avoid going to the mosques, Iranian  government are insisting on building more and more mosques as public spaces! In the cityscape,Turquoise domes have become the power monuments of Islamic republic empty of people rather than public places that welcome citizens.
In old days when Islam entered Iran, Iranians had religious tendencies and old kingdoms developed many worship spots (like mosques and monuments) in the main cities.
After National Revolution of Iran in 1979 Islam became an important part of politics and Mosques became like political power monuments.
The mixture of politics and religion and, in fact, using religion (as people’s belief system) to apply power on people and ignoring their citizenship rights have made a large number of people far from religion sanctities.
While current generations avoid going to the mosques, Iranian government are insisting on building more and more mosques as public spaces!
In the cityscape,Turquoise domes have become the power monuments of Islamic republic empty of people rather than public places that welcome citizens.

Spiritual+Political+Commercial

Some important mosques and monuments are surrounded by bazaars and commerce attracting people not for religious purposes but for  shopping.
Some important mosques and monuments are surrounded by bazaars and commerce attracting people not for religious purposes but for shopping.

Using Islamic Design to Challenge Islamic Monuments (Sou Fujimoto Design for Doha)

Strict religious rules for Mosques' entrants and lack of tendency of citizens for participating in political-religious activities in mosques have made these structures like voids in the cityscape. While there are still numerous architectural firms being charged to design new mosques, how architecture can challenge the current Islamic design rules and invent new design solutions to develop these territories as real public spaces for citizens for other uses than only religious activities. How Islamic architecture that is rigidly territorialized can be blend to the rest of city providing indoor-outdoor public uses?
Strict religious rules for Mosques’ entrants and lack of tendency of citizens for participating in political-religious activities in mosques have made these structures like voids in the cityscape.
While there are still numerous architectural firms being charged to design new mosques, how architecture can challenge the current Islamic design rules and invent new design solutions to develop these territories as real public spaces for citizens for other uses than only religious activities. How Islamic architecture that is rigidly territorialized can be blend to the rest of city providing indoor-outdoor public uses?

Challenging the Rules for Occupants

How architecture can challenge the current strict rules for entrants and improve the right of citizenship for occupying such spaces?
How architecture can challenge the current strict rules for entrants and improve the right of citizenship for occupying such spaces? This design solution for Modern Pristina Central Mosque shows how rigid division between males and females (which is one of the islamic rules for mosques) is challenged.

Islamic Architectural Elements Improving Citizenship Rights for Public Space

Now that Islamic Republic of Iran spends millions of dollars and  occupies hectares of lands for constructing new mosques, how architecture can improve basic citizenship rights in public spaces through constructing mosques? How Islamic design elements like dome and minarets can provide public spaces for people which escape strict rules? For example, how can they reduce exposure and access of committee agents who control people's dressing?
Now that Islamic Republic of Iran spends millions of dollars and occupies hectares of lands for constructing new mosques, how architecture can improve basic citizenship rights in public spaces through constructing mosques? How Islamic design elements like dome and minarets can provide public spaces for people which escape strict rules? For example, how can they reduce exposure and access of committee agents who control people’s dressing?

 

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